Doctor’s Tips: Tennis Elbow

Hello USTA Mid-Atlantic Section members, Dr. Brad Carofino here from Atlantic Orthopaedic Specialists in Virginia Beach, VA! Today I wanted to take the opportunity to discuss something that could be all too common for some of you…Tennis Elbow! However, I also want to review treatment options for it that could speed up your recovery and return to play.

Tennis elbow, or Lateral Epicondylitis, in general terms, is a chronic degenerative overuse pathology that causes pain on the outside portion of the elbow. The muscles that extend the wrist, such as in hitting a backhand volley in tennis, can lead to a degenerative weakening or micro-tearing process of the tendon. The tendon becomes necrotic (dying) over extended periods of overuse…just like during long tournament weekends.

This overuse injury can snow-ball if athletes and patients don’t take proper
measures to stop the process and continue to overuse these wrist extensor muscles leading to further tendon injury.

A research article looked at a 13-year period of patient data and determined that the highest incidence of Tennis Elbow was among individuals aged 40 to 49 years, with 7.8 per 1,000 in male patients and 10.2 per 1,000 in female patients. The second highest incidence was from ages 50 to 59 years, with 7.0 per 1,000 in male patients and 6.7 per 1,000 in female patients.¹

Another interesting article noted that in regards to playing tennis, level of play, hours per day, and weight of racquets were directly related to ones’ possibility of acquiring tennis elbow. Also, athletes who were 40+ years of age and older who used a grip size of 4 3/8” or greater had a significantly greater chance of acquiring tennis elbow.²

When athletes or patients come to see me regarding tennis elbow I typically advise them of a few treatment options.

Above most, appropriate rest and recovery is the best thing someone can do as Tennis Elbow is an overuse injury. During a rest and recovery phase it is wise to perform Tennis Elbow stretches, wear a Tennis Elbow strap, and take oral over-the-counter anti-inflammatories for a brief stint.

If things still aren’t improving, I typically suggest seeing a Physical Therapist or Athletic Trainer to perform soft tissue therapies like massage, tool assisted soft tissue mobilization, ultrasound therapy, and even dry-needling.

If things still don’t turn around you could consider a cortisone injection. This option overall is a treatment that will eliminate pain, but is not shown to actually heal what is causing you pain.

If your elbow is still not responding to those treatment options, then some could consider performing surgery to debride the tendon of the necrotic tissue. As you can see, Tennis Elbow can linger for some time without resolution. The treatment algorithm is vast and sometimes cyclical. If you are having trouble with managing acute or chronic overuse Tennis Elbow, please call my Athletic Trainer, Brice Snyder, MSAT, ATC, OTC at 757-679-3407 to schedule an appointment.


Dr. Brad Carofino is an orthopaedic surgeon who specializes in shoulder, elbow and hand injuries. He is a physician with the Atlantic Orthopaedic Specialists in Virginia Beach, Va. AOS provides Athletic Trainers for several USTA Mid-Atlantic Regional, Sectional and other tennis events.

Resources
1. Sanders, T., Maradit Kremers, H., Bryan , A., Ransom, J., Smith, J., & Morrey , B. (2015, July). The Epidemiology and Health Care Burden of Tennis Elbow: A Population-Based Study. Am J Sports Med, 43(5), 1066-1071.

2. H. William Gruchow, P. D. (1979, July 1). An epidemiologic study of tennis elbow: Incidence, recurrence, and effectiveness of prevention strategies . The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 7(4), 234-238

Why You Need a Weekend Getaway with your Tennis Team

One of the best parts of playing USTA League tennis in the Mid-Atlantic is the friends that you make. These are people that rally for you and cheer you on both on the court and throughout the ups and downs that life throws your way. For many, their tennis team is like family with a bond that has been built from grinding it out during tough tennis matches and from the memorable times spent off the court. Those are the special times together thanks to your love of tennis such as traveling to tournaments, championships or even National events. 

But not every team gets the chance to travel to a Regional or Section championship. That’s why USTA Mid-Atlantic partnered with the Roanoke Valley Tennis Association to create Second Serve to give more teams, especially women’s teams,  the chance to hit the road for fun on court competition against teams from all over the Mid-Atlantic and off court laughs. 

We chatted with Yoshie Nahmens, a current 4.0 who has been playing USTA Leagues for more than ten years, to get her take on the fun of traveling with your tennis team. Yoshie is an active captain in Fairfax, Virginia having captained more than ten teams in the last three years and plays on a variety of others leagues in Northern Virginia.

Girls Getaway - Yoshie Photo 1_350x250What has been your favorite girls’ weekend tennis memory?

This is a tough one since I have had several fun memories that picking just one is a challenge. I would probably say my 3.0/3.5/4.0 team’s win at the 2017 Tri-Level League Sectionals since we were not able to compete to defend our title last year. We were #1 in the local league but lost in the first round of local league playoffs. All matches were very tight and nail biters, so this win was extra sweet and special.

We’ve created so many great friendships off the court through our teams over the years that we’ve created our own weekend getaways. Eleven of us participated in a Wintergreen tennis camp a few years ago. We rented a huge house, cooked all our meals together (it was a cold, rainy & foggy April weekend, so we couldn’t go anywhere), danced, talked and crashed. It was my first ‘tennis camp’ and I loved it. I hope a group of us can go to another tennis camp in the near future. It was so much fun!

How has travelling for tennis been a bonding experience for the ladies on your teams?

We drive 3 hours+ to get to most Region and Section Championships so we usually carpool. Our team also shares hotel room to split the cost and spend more time together.  During travel and stay, we talk about family, kids, vacation, etc. So much quality bonding time – it has been great.

What’s your team’s favorite thing to do off the tennis court when you’re travelling together?Girls Getaway - Series 1 - Photo 2_sized

I normally set up our team dinner on one of the nights when we travel to Regionals and/or Sectionals. Many of our team knows each other pretty well, but it is always fun to get together over great food and great wine (typically) and enjoy lots of laughs. Girls can be girls. It’s the most relaxed moment before the battle on the court.

Team-bonding, beautiful hikes, tasty breweries, late-night laughs, sing-along car rides and heck, maybe even that perfect, “down-the-T” serve will show up on your weekend in the Roanoke Valley at Second Serve, so gather up your tennis girls and let us know you are interested in playing in the inaugural event!  


USTA Mid-Atlantic and the Roanoke Valley Tennis Association are introducing Second Serve, a highly social team competition that has the look of a league championship with teams from all over the Mid-Atlantic competing, but in a fun, low-pressure environment. Second Serve will take place in Roanoke, Va. Teams from the Adult 18 & Over women’s leagues at 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 NTRP levels are eligible to participate in Second Serve. Play will count toward your NTRP rating, but there is no advancement.  Click here to learn more about the event! 

Wimbledon Today, Zonals Tomorrow; Othmane Garma Does It All

We got the chance to chat with Sloane Stephens’ traveling tour coach and USTA Mid-Atlantic’s Othmane Garma, also known as “OG.” Since Garma joined her team 13 months ago, she’s had her most significant results ever. The 25-year-old won her first-ever Grand Slam at the 2017 US Open and, was runner-up at the French Open. While that is impressive, what’s really stand-out is that Garma doesn’t just coach pros. His passion for the game spills into youth tennis as well.

Othmane Garma remembers idolizing professional players and coaches as a 10-year-old kid. Coming to the United States from Morocco at 14 years old, he had two goals in mind: learn English well enough to make friends and earn a full scholarship to a Division I school for tennis. Luckily, J.E.B. Stuart’s high school tennis coach James Holocombe took Garma under his wing, and made both a reality.

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Coach Othmane Garma is making an impact through tennis both with pro players and Mid-Atlantic Juniors alike

“I’ve been very fortunate to have the right voices around me and good people around me that want to see me develop as not only a tennis player but a human being,” said Garma, who grew up in Falls Church, Virginia. “Holocombe helped me learn English and do homework, drove me to tennis lessons, and he saw my passion for tennis.”

Garma had offers from George Mason, Howard, South Florida, and UNC Wilmington but knew he wanted to stay close to the D.C. area that gave him so much. He chose Howard, hoping to play on the ATP tour afterward. But after six months, he realized he didn’t have the financial resources to play professionally, so he turned to coaching.

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Coach Murray Kamau, Sloane Stephens and Coach Othmane Garma

He worked with as many as 40 players a week and generated approximately $110,000 for the Arlington YMCA Tennis Center. He moved on to coaching top juniors and was so successful, he advanced to working with professionals.

One of them was Treat Huey, a University of Virginia graduate who would eventually partner with Max Mirnyi.

“Traveling on the ATP world tour with Othmane helped me have the best season of my career, reaching the Wimbledon semifinals and qualifying for the ATP world tour finals,” Huey said. “His positive attitude was instrumental in the improvement I’ve had in my game.”

Huey and Mirnyi were a top 20 team under Garma, but that didn’t prepare him for the heights he’s attained coaching Sloane Stephens, ranked No. 4 in the world.

“I never pictured in my entire life that I would be holding a U.S. Open trophy as a coach,” said Garma, who works alongside Murray Kamau on Stephens’ team. “Everybody did their role. I was super grateful to be able to see her reach the success she deserves and for me and Coach Kamau, it was a proud moment.”

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Garma and Stephens after victory at the U.S. Open

When Stephens won the U.S. Open last September, she was ranked 83rd, the lowest ranked woman to ever win the title and the first American since 2002.

“Coach Othmane has been a great addition to our team, and his positive approach to everything he does makes him an incredible asset,” Stephens said.

 

 

While Garma continues to thrive as a coach, he’s sticking true to his roots by staying involved in the Mid-Atlantic. At the end of July, Garma will put his pro coaching career on pause and travel to Cary, North Carolina to coach the Mid-Atlantic team at the USTA Southern Zonals. He’ll be working with elite boys and girls, in a format that allows Garma to coach on court during the matches — something he’s looking forward to.

“I’m super excited and really looking forward to connecting with the kids and being able to give back,” Garma said. “I want to inspire them and teach them through experience.”

Talking to Garma, you’ll often hear him use the word “inspire,” along with “motivate” and “create.” In his eyes, those three words strung together are what life is about. Those words are why he’ll be traveling to coach 14-year-olds in the same month that he’s coaching Stephens at Wimbledon.

“I don’t look at it as I’m coaching an amateur or a professional; it’s about delivering the same message in 100 ways depending on the person,” Garma said. “I’m coaching an athlete to be the best they can be and it’s still around tennis.”

While Garma continues to influence the Mid-Atlantic and the WTA tour, life just gave him another opportunity to have an even bigger impact. On June 13th, his wife, Gabriela Falcon, gave birth to their first child, Skyla Jolie Garma.

“I am so excited to introduce baby Skyla to the sport that has done so much for me as soon as she hits the age of 3,” said Garma. “It’ll be her decision to choose what sport she loves and I’ll support her with all the resources I have and more.”


Harry Holtzclaw is an intern with USTA Mid-Atlantic. Harry is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Sports and Recreation Management from James Madison University.

 

 

TGA: A Game Changer for Mid-Atlantic Kids

When you first walk in to the school gym it hits you – the sounds of laughter, fun, and excitement with a distinct buzz of energy. You hear kids happily shouting to a friend, “ok, your turn to hit it to me now!”  As you scan the room, you see faces with smiles that are contagious, and others deep in skillful concentration. There is action everywhere controlled by the coaches in the room that are in the middle of it all, encouraging and guiding the students through their activities.

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This is what you see at a typical TGA Premier Youth Tennis after school program in the Mid-Atlantic.  What you may not see right away though is how this program is changing and benefiting lives – not just through physical activity that all kids need, but through the life lessons the kids are learning and enrichment they are getting through STEM activities too. Review the stats on the impact the program is having, and one can understand why this is a game changer for kids and the sport of tennis in the Mid-Atlantic.

USTA Mid-Atlantic has been offering TGA Premier Youth tennis after school and out-of-school time programs since 2016. In 2017, nearly 4,000 kids in communities across Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia were given the chance to learn tennis and develop personal qualities such as respect, honesty, decision-making and sportsmanship. These kids come from all types of communities – notably, 37 percent of the schools where programs are established service under resourced communities where at least 50 percent of the student population is enrolled in the National Free or Reduced Meal Program.

For some, especially those in under resourced communities, having this type of enrichment program accessible to them is a rarity. This is why USTA Mid-Atlantic is so committed to bringing the program to all types of communities to ensure that kids have a chance to learn tennis, build friendships, develop life skills and play.

We want to reach even more kids and offer these programs at little to no cost to every school in the Mid-Atlantic, but we need your help.

With our spring programs wrapped up and summer programs in action, we are making strong progress to introduce kids to tennis and break down the barriers that get in the way. We need you to help us keep the momentum going and ensure the impact and positive change doesn’t stop.

Here are just some highlights of what we’ve done so far in 2018 in a few of our program areas.

West Virginia

Our TGA after school tennis programs in West Virginia service some of the most under resourced communities, with programs taking place in schools where 100 percent of the student body qualifies for the National Free or Reduced Meal Program. We hit a record of having more than 300 children participating in one season and this spring, 15 scholarships were distributed. Be a game changer and help ensure more kids can get active and play.

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Prince William County, Va.

Prince William is one of our newest areas to offer tennis enrichment programs and one of the most economically diverse as well. The program achieved 300 percent growth for participation compared to the fall 2017 season and awarded more than $800 in scholarships so kids can play. Be a game changer and help us make tennis the most accessible sport in the Mid-Atlantic.

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Loudoun County, Va.

One of our original program areas, students participating in after school and out-of-school time programs are seeing their dedication pay off. Our TGA programs allow players to progress through a five-level color coded path at their own pace. They start at yellow and work toward black level which indicates a strong level of awareness and understanding of the game as well as demonstrated leadership among peers. This spring, two kids participated at the black level which is a first for the Mid-Atlantic. Be a game changer and help us put more kids on the path to success.

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Richmond, Va.

In Richmond, TGA programs were offered at Bensley Elementary which the most economically disadvantaged school in Chesterfield County, servicing a school population with 86 percent qualifying for the National Free or Reduced Meals Program. At this school we were able to award 16 partial scholarships to participants. Be a game changer and help us ensure all kids no matter their background, location, resources, access or ability precludes them from learning the sport of tennis.

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This is just a start; think of what could happen if you help us do even more

Will you help us make it possible for one more child to experience playing tennis? With every gift, USTA Mid-Atlantic moves one step closer to our vision of bringing tennis to all young people and communities in the Mid-Atlantic and breaking down barriers to entry and play.  Make a tax-deductible gift today to support a new player in the game, one who can champion the sport for others for a lifetime.

If you want to learn more about how USTA Mid-Atlantic is making an impact as a charitable 501(c)3 non-profit, visit www.usta.com/midatlanticimpact and continue to visit our blog for inspiring stories of our tennis community.

Tennis Providers: Earn a FREE Net Generation Tablet from USTA Mid-Atlantic

Don’t miss out! Make sure you and your programs are listed and searchable on NetGeneration.com.

As a Net Generation provider, you know you’ve got the expertise of the USTA, world-class coaching curriculum and innovative digital tools all available to you to help you do incredible things to get kids into tennis.

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Net Generation coaches are shaping the future of tennis! Join them and get free tools and resources. 

USTA Mid-Atlantic wants to make sure you don’t miss out on these great benefits and all that Net Generation has to offer, especially the Program Management Center. This is where you can list all of your programs so that parents seeking tennis instruction and fun for their kids can find you!

Add your programs to the Net Generation Program Management Center and you can be eligible to receive a Tablet ($150) pre-loaded with the Net Generation app from USTA Mid-Atlantic. We’re giving away up to 50 tablets, so hurry and get your programs listed by Friday, July 27.

Requirements to be eligible:

  1. Sign up as a provider on Net Generation and complete all of the registration steps, including approval of your NCSI background screen or complete the process if you have not done so.
  2. Agree to the provider standards in your provider profile. Once logged in to Net Generation, access the Provider Menu and click “Edit Profile.” The checkbox to accept the provider standards is at the bottom of the screen.
  3. Post a public youth tennis program on Net Generation. To be eligible, your program must start between July 1, 2018 and September 30, 2018. For additional information on how to access the Program Management Center, click here.
  4. Programs must be entered prior to July 27, 2018. We have 50 tablets available so post today so you can get your hands on one!

All types of tennis providers have shared how useful the Net Generation tools have been, such as the tennis professionals at the McCormack-Nagelsen Tennis Center (MNTC) in Williamsburg, Va. They said, “MNTC loves Net Generation because it is an all-encompassing yet simplified and universal developmental platform for kids to succeed in tennis.  We love the ease and applicability of the assessments, competencies and curriculum. Net Generation connects our parents, players & coaches which will only continue to grow not only our junior programs, but tennis worldwide.”

For questions or assistance, please email Natalie Rogers at rogers@mas.usta.com.

Review the Summer Tablet Promotion_Official Rules.